Korea

5 mouth-watering Korean desserts you should try

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If you have a sweet tooth like me, chances are you’d go first to a dessert table before eating the main course. I’ve always appreciated sweets ever since I was a child so it was no biggie for me to find Korean sweets in the local Korean mart or go to a Korean restaurant and try out their desserts.

Here are some eye candies: 5 Korean desserts you should try out!

Patbingsoo/ Patbingsu

Photo: liststrivia.com

Photo: liststrivia.com

Patbingsoo is a very popular dessert and snack in Korea, it’s perfect for humid and hot weather as well. It’s a sweet shaved ice dessert with toppings including fruits, syrup, condensed milk, ice cream, yogurt and red bean paste. It’s also a preferred snack for many who just took a sauna or hot bath.

Boonguhbbang/ Bungeoppang (Goldfish Bread)

Photo: golden-rama.com

Photo: golden-rama.com

Photo: en.kore.com

Rainbow’s JaeKyung showing her love for Bungeoppang. Photo: en.korea.com

You may have seen this a lot in Korean dramas and movies, or have seen your Kpop idols snack on one. It’s also a popular dessert in Korea. Boonguhbbang is shaped like a fish and is filled with red bean paste. Other varieties include other sweet pastes and even ice cream.

Songpyeon

Photo: flickr.com

Photo: flickr.com

Photo: innolife.com

The hotties of TVXQ snacking on some Songpyeon. Photo: innolife.com

Songpyeon is a traditional Korean snack and dessert made of rice flour. It’s a type of rice cake shaped like a half-moon and usually filled with sweet or semi-sweet fillings. The most popular ones are the sweet red bean paste, chestnut paste and sesame seeds and honey.

Yumilgwa or Yugwa

Photo: chefgunawanmalaysia.blogspot.com

Photo: chefgunawanmalaysia.blogspot.com

Another traditional Korean sweet, the name Yumilgwa has now been shortened to Yugwa. It’s made by deep frying or baking glutinous rice and honey.

Hoppang

Photo: korcan50years.com

Photo: korcan50years.com

Hoppang is a warm snack that’s popular during the winter or during cold days. It’s made of pre-cooked and steamed rice flour dough, filled with red bean paste or some other sweet paste. Some even put vegetables and meat in it.

I love how Korean desserts are healthier compared to other countries but still look delicious and taste heavenly. What’s your favorite Korean dessert?

 

Editing by Timea Baksa

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